EMPLOYMENT

LOAD SECUREMENT POLICY

At Riverside, a safety-first focus paramount for our employees, the public and the environment.

Load Securement Policy

Riverside Contracting, Inc. hauls equipment, asphalt oils, asphalt and gravel on the highway of the United States and Canada.  In doing so, it is the policy of Riverside Contracting Inc. that all drivers that are hauling these commodities follow all the rules and regulations of the Federal Motor Carriers Safety Administration.  The following policy applies to the all employees who move equipment and materials on US and Canadian highways.

Transporting Equipment:

  • All equipment must be secured in accordance with the FMCSA regulation, CFR 393.100 – 393.136.
  • All equipment must be secured prior to moving the vehicle. 
  • Use the correct securement devises with the correct Working Load Limit (WLL).
  • Equipment that weighs 10,000 pounds or more must have a minimum of four chains securing the load.
  • Equipment that weighs less than 10,000 pounds must have a minimum of two chains securing the load.
  • The WLL of the chains shall not be less than ½ the weight of the machine being transported.

 

Chains Size

Working Load Limit

3/8 inch

6600 pounds

1/2 inch

11,300 pounds

 

Example 1:  A machine weighs 68,000 pounds, four ½ chains are required to secure the load.

ü Example 2:  A machine weighs 40,000 pounds, four 3/8 chains are required to secure the load.

  • All implements on a transported machine must be secured with a single chain in addition to the two or four tie down chains.
  • Any defective or damaged securement devices shall be discarded and shall not be used to secure a load being transported.

When chaining down a piece of equipment there are 2 different methods of chaining it to the lowboy, a Direct Pull” or an “Indirect Pull”. 

Direct Pull:  This is when the chain is hooked to the lowboy with one end of the chain and the other end of the chain is hooked to the piece of equipment.  The boomer is hooked in the middle of the chain and the slack of the chain is taken up so the machine will not move.  This method of chaining down the piece of equipment will reduce the tensile strength of the chain by 50%.  Example: if you have 4, 3/8 chains on a piece of equipment to tie it down and the tensile strength is 6600 pounds per chain, for a total of 26,400 pounds, the tensile strength will be reduce by 50% for a tensile strength of 13,200 pounds.  This will not be enough tensile strength for most loads.

Indirect Pull: This is when the chain is looped through an eye on the lowboy and an eye on the machine.  The boomer is then hook on both ends of the chain taking up the slack in the chain so the piece of equipment will not move.  By chaining down a piece of equipment this way there is no reduction in the tensile strength of the chains. 

If possible always tie down your load using the “Indirect Pull” method.  If you cannot tie the equipment down using this method you need to add more chins to the load to make up for the loss of tensile strength.

Flatbeds & Misc Loads:

  • Items that are 5 feet or less in length and weigh less than 1100 pounds require a minimum of one tie down.
  • Items that are 5 feet or less in length and weigh more than 1100 pounds require a minimum of two tie downs.
  • Items longer than 5 feet but less than or equal to 10 feet in length, irrespective of weight, require a minimum of two tie downs. 
  • Two tie downs are required for item that are 10 feet in length and one additional tie down is required for every 10 feet thereafter or fraction of 10 feet.

Example:  if an item is 33 feet long it would require 5 tie downs. Two tie downs for the first 10 feet, one tie down for each additional 10 feet and one for the last 3 feet.

Gravel, Bituminous Material and Dirt:

  • When loading a truck or trailer make sure all of the material gets in the hauling unit.
  • If any material spills in the loading process, clean any excess material off the unit prior to transport.
  • When loading chips or dirt make sure it is not higher than the sides of the unit as the wind will blow it out of the vehicle while transporting.

Tanks:

  • All containment lids must be shut and locked during transport, even when the tank is being transported empty

Riverside Contracting Inc. Management

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