EMPLOYMENT

EQUIPMENT MOBILIZATION RULES & REGULATIONS

At Riverside, a safety-first focus paramount for our employees, the public and the environment.

Equipment Mobilization Rules & Regulations

Equipment mobilization is a very important part of the operations of Riverside Contracting. It is important that every driver is familiar with and understand the basic rules and regulations when moving equipment on state and federal highways. Riverside moves equipment in several states and not all of the states have the same rules. The rules in Wyoming are much different than the rules in Montana.

Riverside moves loads that are non-permitted loads (legal weight, width, height and length) and loads that require a special permit due to being over-weight, over-width, over-length or over-height. The loads range from equipment being hauled on a lowboy to loads being pulled by a tractor. It is the responsibility of the truck driver have the correct permit, if a permit is needed, and to understand the conditions of that permit. The following is the basic rules and regulations. If you do not understand these rules and regulations you must contact Kevin Mackaman prior to moving any equipment.

Legal Dimensions

Width:             8 Feet 6 inches

Length:          Truck/trailer – 55 Feet (Montana), 60 feet (Wyoming)

Truck/trailer/pup – the trailer and pup must be less than 81 feet, the truck can be any length.

Height:           14 Feet

Weight:  The legal weight that can be hauled is determined by the distance between each axle.  This is called the bridge of the vehicle.  Depending on the number of axles and the distance between each axle that is what determines the max weight of the vehicle.

Examples of Tractor/Trailer/Pup:

            X                     X         X                                 X         X         X

                  10’6”          4’ 6”             36’                   4’ 6”    4’ 6”

      12,000                  34,000                                           40,000

            X                     X         X         X                                 X         X         X        

                  10’ 6”        5’ 4”     4’ 6”             36’                  4’ 6”    4’ 6”

      12,000                       41,000                                           41,000

X                     X         X         X                                 X         X         X                     X            X     

        10’ 6”        5’ 4”     4’ 6”             36’                  4’ 6”    4’ 6

12,000                  41,000                                           41,000                    15,000    15,000

Permits

There are several different permits that can be purchased.  The permits in Montana are different than the permits in Wyoming.  Below is the conditions in each state.

Montana:

Single Trip Permits: Single trip permit are purchased for overweight and/or over dimension.  If a load is over the legal axle load limit an overweight permit must be purchased.  If a load is over the allowable dimension that is on the term permit in the truck or if the truck does not have a term permit a single trip dimension permit must be purchased.  The load cannot move until the permit is purchased and the driver has a hard copy of the permit of a permit number.  If the load is being moved under the conditions of a permit number, a hard copy of the permit will be print at the first scale.

Term Permits:  Term permits are annual permits that are purchased for each lowboy and belly dump.  They expire on 12/31 of that year.  There are two different term permits that can be purchased.

  1. Dimensional Term Permit:  This allows the tractor to haul or tow a load that can up to the following dimensions.
    1. Width – 15 feet
    2. Length – 95 feet
    3. Height – 15 feet 6 inches (on a non-divisible load); 14 feet 6 inches if the load is a divisible load.

If a piece of equipment that is being hauled or being towed exceeds any of the above dimensions and additional single trip permit must be purchased.  This is a $10 permit and it is for the measurement that it exceeds on the term permit.

2.  Weight Term Permit: A weight term permit allows the lowboy or tractor to haul up 20,000 over weight without have to purchase a permit. There are several conditions that go with that permit.

  1. The entire unit, truck and trailer, must have a vehicle analysis that is issued by the State of Montana the exactly matches the axle configuration of that vehicle.  This shows the maximum allowable weight the vehicle can haul under various conditions.  The analysis must be in the truck at all times.  Without the analysis the permit is null and void. 
  2. Any 3 axle group cannot exceed 15,000 lbs.
  3. Overall weight cannot exceed 20,000 lbs.
  4. If the load exceeds 20,000 lbs. a single trip permit must be purchased for the entire excess amount.  The 20,000 lb. permit will not work.

Wyoming: 

Single Trip Permits: Single trip permit are purchased for weight and/or dimension.  If a load is over the legal axle load limit an overweight permit must be purchased.  If the load is over the legal dimensions a single trip permit must be purchased.  The state of Wyoming does not sell an annual term permit for weight or dimension.  The load cannot move until the permit is purchased and the driver has a hard copy of the permit in the truck.  If the load passes by a Wyoming port on the way to the loads destination, the port can be called, all the information of the truck and load can be given to the officer.  A clearance number is assigned to the load and the permit can be purchased at the port when the load arrives.  If an over-weight or over-dimension load is entering the State of Wyoming from another state the port must be called and a clearance number must be assigned to the load prior to entering the state. If the load arrives at the port without a clearance number the driver will receive a citation. 

Annual Trailer Permit:  An annual trailer permit can be purchased for our lowboy trailers that are over 8 foot 6 inches in width.  This allows that trailer to be pulled through the state of Wyoming without purchasing a single trip permit when you are empty.  The trailer must be registered in Wyoming or the permit cannot be purchased.  The permit stays with the trailer not the truck.

Permit Conditions

Montana:

Every permit that is purchased has traveling conditions that are part of the permit.  It is up to the driver hauling or towing the piece of equipment to understand what the permit conditions are and follow them.  If you do not follow the permit conditions it could result in a citation, the permit is null and void or the permit privileges of the company can be revoked. Not all single trip permits that are issued have the same conditions.  The conditions that are tied to the particular permit are based on the weight, dimension, highway traveled, and if the load is moved on a holiday or holiday weekend.

General Conditions: 

  1. Maximum speed is 65 mph or otherwise indicated on the permit or posted on the highway. (10 MPH Bridge Centerline or 10 MPH is a maximum of 55 mph or otherwise posted.)
  2. The permit must be carried in the truck at all times. The load can be moved on a permit number and a hard copy printed off at the first scale.  The conditions of the permit must be known, understood and followed.
  3. Trip permit is valid for 72 hours.
  4. Permit holder must comply with all State and FMCSA regulations.
  5. Must have all the pages of the permit to be valid.

Red Route Conditions:  Red Routes are designated sections of highways that are subject to very high volumes of traffic on Friday after 3 pm until sunrise on Saturday and 12 pm Sunday until sunrise Monday.   Oversized and overweight loads cannot be moved during these time periods.  The load can be moved all day on Saturday.  Red Route conditions are roads that may not be travel if the load exceeds 10 feet wide, 14 feet 6 inches high or 110 feet long.   Make sure you know where the Red Routes roads are located.  If you do not know where the Red Routes are located or do not have access to a Red Route map, call Kevin Mackaman to get the locations.

Continuous Travel: The load can travel in hours of Darkness, Weekends and Holidays if the load does not exceed 10 feet wide, 15 feet 6 inches high.    The load can move 7 days a week, except if the dimensions exceed the above dimensions. 

Holiday Travel: Travel is not allowed on a Holiday or on a Holiday weekend if the load exceeds 12 feet 6 inches wide, 15 feet 6 inches high. 

10 MPH BC Conditions:  10 MPH Bridge Centerline conditions are Maximum weight conditions.  On non-interstate highway the towing unit must stop approximately 50 feet before the structure.  Proceed at a maximum speed of 10 mph, the truck must be on centerline all the way across the structure.  The load must be escorted by 2 pilot cars, one in the front of the load and one in the rear.  The pilot cars must stop traffic on each side of the structure not allowing any traffic on the structure at the same time as the load moving across. Travel in daylight hours only with a Maximum speed of 55 mph. 

10 MPH BC conditions do not apply to interstate highways.

10 MPH Conditions:  On non-interstate highway the towing unit must stop approximately 50 feet before the structure.  Proceed at a maximum speed of 10 mph in your own lane.

One pilot car in the rear of the load is required. 

Pilot Car Requirements:

Non-interstate;  One pilot car is required in the front of any load that is over 12 feet 6 inches wide and traveling on a 2 lane highway. Pilot cars front and rear are required if the load exceeds 16 feet 6 inches wide.  2 pilot cars are required on all BCL loads, one in the front and one in the rear.  A rear pilot car is required for all overweight 10MPH loads. One pilot car is required for all loads that exceed 150 feet in length.

Interstate;  One pilot car is required in the rear on an interstate highway if the load is over 16 feet 6 Inches wide or two pilot cars if the load exceeds 18 feet wide.  No pilot cars are required for 10MPH & BCL weight condition loads. 

 

Routes:  All permits have designated routes that must be followed.  If the routes are not followed for any reason the permit is “null and void”.  It is the same as having no permit at all.  If the designated route needs to be changed for any reason the state permitting office must be contacted and the permit must be amended prior to any movement. 

Signs & Flagging: Any loads over 10’ wide, 14’ height or 60’ long (single unit) must display warning signs that read “OVERSIZED LOAD” front and rear on the load.  Flags on all four corners of the load and additional flags at the widest point if in the middle of the load. Tractors and lowboy must take the signs off when they are not hauling or towing a load. A citation may be issued if the signs are on the tractor or trailer and it is empty.

Wyoming:

General Conditions: 

  1. The permit must be carried in the truck at all times. Must have a hard copy of the permit prior to moving the load. The load cannot be moved with a permit number.    The routes and conditions of the permit must be known, understood and followed.
  2. Trip permit for a reasonable amount of time, not to exceed 4 days.
  3. Permit holder must comply with all State and FMCSA regulations.
  4. Must have all the pages of the permit to be valid.

Continuous Travel:  The movement of any oversized load of vehicle shall be made only during daylight hours.  Warning flags are required on all four corner of the load.  Additional flags are required if any of the load exceeds the width of the front or rear.  Flags are also required if there is a rear overhang of more than 4 feet.  Overweight loads that are within legal dimensions are not restricted to daylight hours.

Holiday Travel:  Oversized loads requiring pilot cars will not be allowed on legal holidays or during local celebrations when heavy local traffic is anticipated.

Legal Holidays when travel is restricted are:

  1. January 1 – New Year Day
  2. May – Memorial Day (Last Monday in May)
  3. July 4 – Independence Day
  4. September – Labor Day (First Monday in September)
  5. November _ Thanksgiving Day (Fourth Thursday of November)
  6. December 25 – Christmas Day

Movement requiring pilot cars will not be permitted to travel from ½ hour after sunset in the day before the holiday to ½ hour before sunrise the day after the holiday.  When a holiday is combined with a weekend for a 3 day weekend, these restrictions will be in force from ½ hour after sunset the day preceding the holiday weekend through ½ hour before sunrise the day following the holiday weekend. When a holiday falls on a Saturday, no move requiring pilot cars will be permitted from ½ hour after sunset Thursday to ½ hour before sunrise Monday and when a holiday falls on a Sunday, no move requiring pilot cars will be permitted from ½ hour after sunset Friday to ½ hour before sunrise Tuesday. Oversized loads may be restricted during inclement weather or on ice and snow covered highways. Inclement weather includes rain, fog, snow, ice and high winds.

Routes:  All permits have designated routes that must be followed.  If the routes are not followed for any reason the permit is “null and void”.  It is the same as having no permit at all.  If the designated route needs to be changed for any reason the state permitting office must be contacted and the permit must be amended. 

Pilot Car Requirements:  Pilot cars are required on two lane or secondary highways when a portion of the vehicle exceeds 14 feet in width.  Pilot cars are required on interstate highways divided highways and 4 lane roadways when the vehicle exceeds 15 feet. The Wyoming Highway Patrol may require additional pilot cars depending on the width of the load.

Pilot cars are required on two lane or secondary highways when the vehicle exceeds 110 feet in overall length.  On interstate highways and divided highways pilot cars for length will be at the discretion of the Wyoming Highway Patrol.

Signs & Flagging: Any loads over 8’ 6” wide, 14’ height or 60’ long (single unit) must display warning signs that read “OVERSIZED LOAD” front and rear on the load.  Flags on all four corners of the load and additional flags at the widest point if in the middle of the load. Tractors and lowboy must take the signs off when they are not hauling or towing a load. A citation may be issued if the signs are on the tractor or trailer and it is empty.

 

Pickups Towing Trailers in all States

Riverside Contracting is classified as an “Interstate” commercial carrier.  This means that the company conducts trucking operations in multiple jurisdictions, Montana, Wyoming, Idaho and several other states from time to time.  Because we are an interstate carrier we fall under the federal regulations concerning pickups pulling trailers.

All drivers of pickups towing trailers with loads on (i.e. equipment, supplies, pipe, etc.) with a total combined weight less than 25,999 pounds must have a current Medical Certificate. 

If a driver is towing a trailer with a combined weight of 26,000 pounds or greater the driver must have a Medical Certificate and a Class A, Commercial Driver License.

The regulation is:  Any vehicle with a combined weight of 10,000 pounds is considered a commercial vehicle.  Therefore the driver must have a current Medical Certificate or a  Class A, Commercial Driver License or both depending on the combined weight of the load.  The size of the truck does not matter.

It is the responsibility and condition of employment for every driver of Riverside Contracting to be familiar with and understand the rules and regulations when transporting equipment on all highways.  If you have questions of do not understand the regulation contact Kevin Mackaman, Safety Compliance Manager of Riverside Contracting, before you move any equipment.

 

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